Lot and the Second Exodus

While reading some notes about this week’s portion, I noticed something regarding Lot that I’ve never noticed before that connects the Lot story with the Second Exodus!!

As many others have pointed out before, Lot’s escape from Sodom is a Passover story. The basis most recognize for this assertion is Genesis 19:3.

19 Now the two angels came to Sodom in the evening as Lot was sitting at the gate of Sodom. When Lot saw them, he stood up to meet them and bowed down with his face to the ground. And he said, “Now behold, my lords, please turn aside into your servant’s house, and spend the night, and wash your feet; then you may rise early and go on your way.” They said, “No, but we shall spend the night in the public square.” Yet he strongly urged them, so they turned aside to him and entered his house; and he prepared a feast for them and baked unleavened bread, and they ate.

While ‘feast’ does not connect with ‘moed’, the word ‘matzah’ does. And, Genesis 18 is believed to have happened right before Passover.

So the larger scope is that Lot and daughters are rescued from judgment and destruction right after eating a feast with matzah.

There are other connections that seem to parallel Revelation such as two witnesses coming to warn Lot and the people in general of impending destruction. They strike the men of the city with blindness, a type of plague. The cities are destroyed by fire and brimstone, the prophesied judgment of the end… Further, the angels taking Lot and family out of the city at dawn parallels the first exodus from Egypt and has strong echoes of Deuteronomy 30 and Matthew 24 and the latter days gathering. Compare,

then the Lord your God will restore you from captivity, and have compassion on you (See Genesis 19:16 ‘…the compassion of the Lord was upon him…’), and will gather you again from all the peoples where the Lord your God has scattered you. If any of your scattered countrymen are at the ends of the earth (Heb. ‘sky’), from there the Lord your God will gather you, and from there He will bring you back. 

Deu. 30:3-4

31 And He will send forth His angels with a great trumpet blast, and they will gather together His elect from the four winds, from one end of the sky to the other.

Matthew 24:31

All these connections I was familiar with, but this time, I saw a couple additional details not previously noticed.

Recently, I posted an article titled, King David as Prophecy of the Second Exodus. In that article I noted that before David ascended the throne of Judah and later kol Israel, he had two wives that interestingly represent by their regional connection and in their naming, the two houses of Israel. And, he took them into the wilderness of the Negev to escape the pursuit of King Saul, the Benjamite, who sought to kill him. That was a new picture…

Then, here is Lot, escaping judgment, into the wilderness, with two sisters, the daughters of one mother.

BOOM! Clear connection to still another set of Scriptures!

Ezekiel 23 describes the house of Israel and the house of Judah as,

23 The word of the Lord came to me again, saying, “Son of man, there were two women, the daughters of one motherand they prostituted themselves in Egypt. They prostituted themselves in their youth; there their breasts were squeezed and there their virgin breasts were handled. Their names were Oholah the elder and Oholibah her sister. And they became Mine, and they gave birth to sons and daughters. And as for their names, Samaria is Oholah and Jerusalem is Oholibah.

Ezekiel 23:1-4

The point that is demonstrated between these several passages, at the gathering to the wilderness and at the time of the ascension of the Son of David to the throne, the two houses will walk together, but still be viewed as two separate but united brides.

Even the names of the two resulting sons, or peoples, have a shadow connection.

Moab, meaning ‘of his father’ bears a shadow to the house of Judah, while Benammi means ‘son of my people’ a possible pointing to Yeshua who is the recognized King of the scattered northern house of Israel, mostly found in church pews.

With the Lot story, obviously the image gets skewed by the activity of the daughters in the cave with Lot, but the parallel parts still make a firm connection. Even moreso when one considers that Abraham relented in his pleading in Genesis 18:32 with ‘ten men?’ Is that an additional picture pointing to the rescue of the ten tribes scattered, where Judah is back in the Land? Quite possibly!

As with previous articles on the topic of God’s two brides, there may be pushback, but the pattern continues to grow stronger! The evidence is approaching the ‘overwhelming’ level.

Now, I wonder if I need to revisit 2 Chronicles 24 for details I missed… Hmmm…

Selah!

About Pete Rambo

Details in 'About' page @ natsab.wordpress.com Basically, husband of one, father of four. Pastor x 11 years, former business and military background. Micro-farmer. Messianic believer in Yeshua haMashiach!
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3 Responses to Lot and the Second Exodus

  1. Patricia says:

    Thank you for this, hadn’t made the connection before

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Joash and the Third Temple | natsab

  3. itsyahushua says:

    Excellent post! I also see Week 5 in the Torah portions as being a foreshadowing of the end times.

    Eleazar represents he Holy Spirit going to the earth to see if the Bride is ready. Bringing the bride to the groom. A reversal of the traditional model of the groom returning to the bride to marry her after his father sent him to get her.

    I really appreciate what you said. Good stuff!

    Shalom!

    Liked by 1 person

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